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How to deal with Illegal Interview Questions

How to deal with Illegal Interview Questions. There’s no doubt that in today’s competitive job market, applicants are under a lot of pressure. Acing the interview is undoubtedly one of the most challenging parts of the process, and illegal interview questions can throw off even the most experienced job seeker. Whether or not the unlawful questions seem intentional, you shouldn’t feel obligated to answer them. However, you probably don’t want the interview to go completely downhill, especially if you still want a shot at the job.

Thankfully, anyone can tackle awkward, intimidating, or illegal interview questions with the right mindset and preparation. Interviews are an opportunity to prove yourself, but they’re not supposed to give interviewers the chance to potentially discriminate against you. Remember: anything related to race, religion, gender, age, family life, and your living situation is off the table. If you’re living in the US, be sure to research what is and isn’t legal to ask in your specific state. For example, it’s illegal for employers to ask about your previous salary in California.  Read more

Guide to Answering Common Interview Questions

popular questions during an interview.

Wouldn’t it be great if you knew exactly what questions a hiring manager would be asking you in your next job interview? A pocketbook, made just for you, containing all the popular questions during an interview.

We can’t read minds, but we can give you the next best thing: a list of some of the most asked interview questions, along with advice for answering them all.

While we don’t recommend having a canned response for every interview question (in fact, please don’t) we do however recommend spending some time getting comfortable with what you might be asked, what hiring managers are really looking for, and what it takes to reflect that you’re the right person for the job.

Interview Question and Answer Study Guide:

1. Tell Me About Yourself.

This question seems simple, so many people fail to prepare for it, but it’s crucial. Here’s the deal: Don’t give your complete employment (or personal) history. Instead, give a pitch—one that’s concise, compelling, and shows exactly why you’re the right fit for the job. Talk a little bit about your current role (including the scope and perhaps one big accomplishment,) then give some background as to how you got there and experience you have that’s relevant. Finally, segue into why you want—and would be perfect for—this role.

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